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Name: Ahmad Mortaja
Address: , Saudi Arabia
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Date of Registration: 06/23/2016
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 Ahmad Mortaja

The southern frontispiece of Quba Mosque.

The southern frontispiece of Quba Mosque.

"The Quba Mosque is the first mosque ever to be built in Islam. The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) himself set its plan when he arrive in old quarter of the Medinian clan (Bani Amr ibn Auf) on his way from Mecca (Makkah) to Medina. Since then, has been renewed many times, the last one done by King Fahd bin Abdu Alaziz Al Saud in 1985.



Although The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) eventually settled in Medina and established his mosque there, he used to pay weekly visit to Quba Mosque.". and he advised others to do the same, saying, "Whoever makes ablutions at home and then goes and prays in the Mosque of Quba, he will have a reward like that of an 'Umrah." This hadith is reported by Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Al-Nasa'i, Ibn Majah and Hakim al-Nishaburi.



It is noted that Quba Mosque mentioned in the Holy Quran, the 9th Surah (Chapter), verse number 108 : {...the mosque whose foundation was laid from the first day on piety is more worthy that you stand therein (to pray). In it are men who love to clean and to purify themselves. And Allah loves those who make themselves clean and pure}

Enclose look at Babussalam (Al-Salam) gate of The Prophet's Mosque

Enclose look at Babussalam (Al-Salam) gate of The Prophet's Mosque

General view of Babussalam (Al-Salam) gate of The Prophet's Mosque (Al-Masjid Al-Nabawi). And you can see the Ottoman style on the gate.

View of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque.

View of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque.

General view of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque (Al Masjid Al Nabawi) (Nabawi Mosque) . the picture shows clearly the Ottoman building and its minarets, the minarets of King Abdu Al-Aziz Al-Saud expansion that was built in 1372 A.H. / 1952 A.D , and two minarets of the King Fahd bin Abdu Al-Aziz Al-Saud that was built in the late 1400's A.H / 1980's A.D. The picture also shows Uhud Mountain in the back.

A visitor reading a sign describes the rare calligraphic panel display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia

A visitor reading a sign describes the rare calligraphic panel display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia

A visitor (probably from Pakistan) reading a sign talking about the rare calligraphic panel displayed next to it.

This calligraphic panel was executed by Ottoman Sultan Mahmud II (1785-1839). It was written in pure gold ink, showing the words (Allah is the Grantor of success) in Ath-Thulth Al-Jaliyy script.

The Sultan Mahmud II was the 30th Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, the posthumous son of Sultan Abdul-Hameed I. He, the Sultan, had a greate passion for calligraphy and studied it under the well known calligrapher, Mostafa Raaqim. He executed numerous calligraphic pieces that spread in many mosques. Furthermore, he had also handwritten two copies of the Holy Qur'an during his reign.

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A beautiful copy of the Qur'an handwritten in Al-Muhaqqaq and An-Naskh scripts, endowed by Khadeejah Firdaws Khanim. Notice that the first and last lines on each page are written in Al-Muhaqqaq script in pure gold ink and the middle line also in Al-Muhaqqaq script but in blue ink. The lines in between are written in An-Naskh script in black ink. However, the calligrapher's name and the date it was handwritten are unknown.

View of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque.

View of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque.

General view of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) . the picture shows clearly the Ottoman building and its minarets, the minarets of King Abdu Al-Aziz Al-Saud expansion that was built in 1372 A.H. / 1952 A.D , and two minarets of the King Fahd bin Abdu Al-Aziz Al-Saud that was built in the late 1400's A.H / 1980's A.D. The picture also shows Uhud Mountain in the back.

A man take a photo by his phone of a rare manuscripts of Koran on displayed at The Holy Qur

A man take a photo by his phone of a rare manuscripts of Koran on displayed at The Holy Qur

A beautiful copy of the Qur'an handwritten in Al-Muhaqqaq and An-Naskh scripts, endowed by Khadeejah Firdaws Khanim. Notice that the first and last lines on each page are written in Al-Muhaqqaq script in pure gold ink and the middle line also in Al-Muhaqqaq script but in blue ink. The lines in between are written in An-Naskh script in black ink. However, the calligrapher's name and the date it was handwritten are unknown.

Quba Mosque from Al-Hijrah Street

Quba Mosque from Al-Hijrah Street

"The Quba Mosque is the first mosque ever to be built in Islam. The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) himself set its plan when he arrive in old quarter of the Medinian clan (Bani Amr ibn Auf) on his way from Mecca (Makkah) to Medina. Since then, has been renewed many times, the last one done by King Fahd bin Abdu Alaziz Al Saud in 1985.



Although The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) eventually settled in Medina and established his mosque there, he used to pay weekly visit to Quba Mosque.". and he advised others to do the same, saying, "Whoever makes ablutions at home and then goes and prays in the Mosque of Quba, he will have a reward like that of an 'Umrah." This hadith is reported by Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Al-Nasa'i, Ibn Majah and Hakim al-Nishaburi.



It is noted that Quba Mosque mentioned in the Holy Quran, the 9th Surah (Chapter), verse number 108 : {...the mosque whose foundation was laid from the first day on piety is more worthy that you stand therein (to pray). In it are men who love to clean and to purify themselves. And Allah loves those who make themselves clean and pure}

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A beautiful copy of the Qur'an handwritten in Al-Muhaqqaq and An-Naskh scripts, endowed by Khadeejah Firdaws Khanim. Notice that the first and last lines on each page are written in Al-Muhaqqaq script in pure gold ink and the middle line also in Al-Muhaqqaq script but in blue ink. The lines in between are written in An-Naskh script in black ink. However, the calligrapher's name and the date it was handwritten are unknown.

General view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

General view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

General view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) from the South-East corner. The picture shows a hotel under construction in the front of the mosque and his courtyard, and the Uhud Mountain in the back.

One of Quba Mosque's Minarets

One of Quba Mosque's Minarets

"The Quba Mosque is the first mosque ever to be built in Islam. The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) himself set its plan when he arrive in old quarter of the Medinian clan (Bani Amr ibn Auf) on his way from Mecca (Makkah) to Medina. Since then, has been renewed many times, the last one done by King Fahd bin Abdu Alaziz Al Saud in 1985.



Although The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) eventually settled in Medina and established his mosque there, he used to pay weekly visit to Quba Mosque.". and he advised others to do the same, saying, "Whoever makes ablutions at home and then goes and prays in the Mosque of Quba, he will have a reward like that of an 'Umrah." This hadith is reported by Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Al-Nasa'i, Ibn Majah and Hakim al-Nishaburi.



It is noted that Quba Mosque mentioned in the Holy Quran, the 9th Surah (Chapter), verse number 108 : {...the mosque whose foundation was laid from the first day on piety is more worthy that you stand therein (to pray). In it are men who love to clean and to purify themselves. And Allah loves those who make themselves clean and pure}

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A Rare manuscript of Koran handwritten in Al-Andalusi script on deer skin with beautiful and exquisite decoration.

General view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

General view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

General view of the frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) from the South-East corner.

One of Quba Mosque's Minarets

One of Quba Mosque's Minarets

"The Quba Mosque is the first mosque ever to be built in Islam. The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) himself set its plan when he arrive in old quarter of the Medinian clan (Bani Amr ibn Auf) on his way from Mecca (Makkah) to Medina. Since then, has been renewed many times, the last one done by King Fahd bin Abdu Alaziz Al Saud in 1985.



Although The Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) eventually settled in Medina and established his mosque there, he used to pay weekly visit to Quba Mosque.". and he advised others to do the same, saying, "Whoever makes ablutions at home and then goes and prays in the Mosque of Quba, he will have a reward like that of an 'Umrah." This hadith is reported by Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Al-Nasa'i, Ibn Majah and Hakim al-Nishaburi.



It is noted that Quba Mosque mentioned in the Holy Quran, the 9th Surah (Chapter), verse number 108 : {...the mosque whose foundation was laid from the first day on piety is more worthy that you stand therein (to pray). In it are men who love to clean and to purify themselves. And Allah loves those who make themselves clean and pure}

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A Rare manuscript of Koran handwritten in Al-Andalusi script on deer skin with beautiful and exquisite decoration.

Close look at the Southeast side of the Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque.

Close look at the Southeast side of the Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque.

A more closely view at The Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) from the South-East corner; showing, in detail, the Green Dome that was built by Sultan Qalawoon Al-Salihi in 678 A.H / 1282 A.D, and the southeast minaret that re-built by the Ottoman Sultan, Abdu Al Majeed in 1265 A.H / 1828 A.D

Close look at the Southeast side of the Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque.

Close look at the Southeast side of the Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque.

A more closely view at The Ottoman building of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) from the South-East corner; showing, in detail, the Green Dome that was built by Sultan Qalawoon Al-Salihi in 678 A.H / 1282 A.D, and the southeast minaret that re-built by the Ottoman Sultan, Abdu Al Majeed in 1265 A.H / 1828 A.D

A group of Turkish visitors look attentively at an old piece of curtain of The Kaaba at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia.

A group of Turkish visitors look attentively at an old piece of curtain of The Kaaba at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia.

A group of Turkish Visitors standing look attentively at an old piece of curtain for The Kaaba from the Ottoman era, at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition that held in Medina, Saudi Arabia; while a Turkish exhibit guide describing to them the history of that curtain,

This piece of curtain was part of huge curtains covers the Kaaba. It was woven in fine black silk, with its silk ground embroidered with gold-coated silver metal threads. It was written in the reign of the Ottoman Sultan, Sultan Abdul Hamid II in 1883, 1300 A.H by the famous calligrapher, Abdullaah Zuhdi (1836-1879) (1251-1296 A.H).

A 16th century rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A 16th century rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A Rare manuscript of Koran handwritten by Darweesh Muhammad Ibn Mustafa Daddah Ibn Hamdullah Al-Amasl in 1553.

General view of the southeast corner of the Prophet's Mosque (Al-Masjid Al Nabawi)

General view of the southeast corner of the Prophet's Mosque (Al-Masjid Al Nabawi)

General view of the southwest corner of the Prophet's Mosque (Al-Masjid Al Nabawi), where you can see the minarets of the old mosque that was built by the Ottomans, and the newest one that was built in The King Fahd Al Saud expansion between 1985 to 1994.

Panoramic view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

Panoramic view of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque)

Panoramic view of the south frontispiece of the Prophet's Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) . the picture also shows King Abdu Allah bin Abdu Al-Aziz Al-Saud expansion under construction, in which it was started in 2013 on Eastern side of the mosque. Furthermore, Uhud Mountain can be seen in the back, and Sala'a Mountain and the Ottoman fortifications on it in the far left.

A piece of curtain of The Kaaba from the Ottoman era display at Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia

A piece of curtain of The Kaaba from the Ottoman era display at Qur'an Exhibition. Medina, Saudi Arabia

A piece of Ottoman curtain for The Kaaba presented at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, in Medina, Saudi Arabia.

This piece of curtain was part of huge curtains covers the Kaaba. It was woven in fine black silk, with its silk ground embroidered with gold-coated silver metal threads. It was written in the reign of the Ottoman Sultan, Sultan Abdul Hamid II in 1883, 1300 A.H by the famous calligrapher, Abdullaah Zuhdi (1836-1879) (1251-1296 A.H).

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A rare manuscripts of Qur'an on display at The Holy Qur'an Exhibition, Medina, Saudi Arabia

A beautiful copy of the Qur'an handwritten in Al-Muhaqqaq and An-Naskh scripts, endowed by Khadeejah Firdaws Khanim. Notice that the first and last lines on each page are written in Al-Muhaqqaq script in pure gold ink and the middle line also in Al-Muhaqqaq script but in blue ink. The lines in between are written in An-Naskh script in black ink. However, the calligrapher's name and the date it was handwritten are unknown.